Andrew McAfee

Andrew McAfee

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Andrew W. Moore

Andrew W. Moore

Andrew W. Moore, a distinguished computer scientist with expertise in machine learning and robotics, became dean of the Carnegie Mellon University School of Computer Science in August 2014. He had previously served as a professor of computer science and robotics before taking a leave of absence to become founding director of Google’s Pittsburgh engineering office in 2006. Moore’s research interests broadly encompass the field of big data – applying statistical methods and mathematical formulas to massive quantities of information, ranging from web searches to astronomy to medical records, to identify patterns and extract meaning from that information. His past research also has included improving the ability of robots and other automated systems to sense the world around them and respond appropriately.

Deidre K. Mulligan

Deirdre K. Mulligan

Deirdre K. Mulligan is an associate professor in the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley, a faculty co-director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, and a principal investigator on the new Hewlett-funded Berkeley Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity.  Mulligan’s research explores legal and technical means of protecting values such as privacy, freedom of expression and fairness in emerging technical systems.  Mulligan shares with a colleague the 2016 International Association of Privacy Professionals Leadership Award for their research contributions to the field of privacy protection. She chairs the board of directors of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a leading advocacy organization protecting global online civil liberties and human rights, and is a founding member of the standing committee for the AI 100 project, a 100-year effort to study and anticipate how the effects of artificial intelligence will ripple through every aspect of how people work, live and play. Previously, she was a clinical professor of law, founding director of the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic, and director of Clinical Programs at the UC Berkeley School of Law.

Fei-Fei Li

Fei-Fei Li

Fei-Fei Li is an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University and director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab, the Stanford Vision Lab and the recently established Stanford Toyota Center for Human-Centric AI Research. She researches machine learning, deep learning, computer vision and cognitive and computational neuroscience. She has published more than 150 scientific articles in top-tier journals and conferences, including Nature, PNAS and the Journal of Neuroscience. Li holds a bachelor’s degree  in physics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Prior to joining Stanford, she was on the faculty at Princeton and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She is the inventor of ImageNet and the ImageNet Challenge, a critical large-scale dataset and benchmarking effort that has contributed to the latest developments in deep learning and AI. In addition to her technical contributions, Li is a national leading voice for advocating diversity in STEM and AI. She is co-founder of Stanford’s renowned SAILORS outreach program for high school girls. Work by Li and her colleagues has been featured in a variety of popular press magazines and newspapers including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Fortune Magazine, Science, Wired Magazine, MIT Technology Review, the Financial Times and others.

Françoise Beaufays

Françoise Beaufays

Françoise Beaufays is a research scientist at Google, where she leads a team of engineers, researchers and linguists working on speech recognition and mobile keyboard input. Her area of scientific expertise covers neural networks, acoustic modeling, language modeling and other technologies related to natural language processing. Her scientific interests revolve around data science and machine intelligence and on bringing their magic to technology users around the world. Beaufays studied mechanical and electrical engineering in Brussels, Belgium. She holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and a Ph.D. minor in Italian literature, both from Stanford University.

Guruduth Banavar

Guruduth Banavar

Guruduth (Guru) Banavar, Ph.D., is vice president and chief science officer for cognitive computing at IBM. He is responsible for advancing the next generation of cognitive technologies and solutions with IBM's global scientific ecosystem, including academia, government agencies and other partners. Most recently, he led the team responsible for creating new AI technologies and systems in the IBM Watson family, designed to augment human expertise in all industries.  Previously, as chief technology officer for IBM's Smarter Cities Initiative, Banavar designed and implemented big data and analytics systems to make cities more livable and sustainable. He previously served as director of IBM Research in India, where he and his team received a presidential award for improving technology access with the Spoken Web project. He also has served on task forces such as New York Governor Cuomo’s commission to improve resilience to natural disasters.  Banavar holds more than 25 patents and has published extensively, with his work featured in media outlets around the world.

Issie Lapowsky

Issie Lapowsky

Issie Lapowsky is a senior writer for WIRED, where she has been covering the intersection of tech, politics and national affairs. Before that, she wrote for WIRED’s business team, reporting on tech companies including Facebook, Twitter and Google, as well as undiscovered startups leading their industries. Prior to WIRED, Lapowsky worked for Inc. magazine and the New York Daily News.

Jeannette M. Wing

Jeannette M. Wing

Jeannette M. Wing is Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research, overseeing the company’s basic research labs worldwide. She is Consulting Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon.  From 2007-2010 she was the Assistant Director of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation.  She received all her degrees in Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her general research interests are trustworthy computing, specification and verification, concurrent and distributed systems, cyber-physical systems, programming languages, and software engineering.  Her current interests are in the foundations of security and privacy. She is Chair of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Section on Information, Computing and Communications and on the Board of Trustees for the Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics. She was on the faculty at the University of Southern California, and has worked at Bell Laboratories and Xerox Palo Alto Research Laboratories.  She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.

Michael Boninger, MD

Dr. Michael Boninger is a professor and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) endowed vice chair for research in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Medicine. He has joint appointments in the departments of Bioengineering, Rehabilitation Science and Technology, and the McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine. He is senior medical director for post-acute care for the Health Services Division of UPMC. He  also is a physician researcher for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Boninger earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and his medical degree from The Ohio State University.  His research focuses on enabling increased function and participation for individuals with disabilities through development and application of assistive, rehabilitative and regenerative technologies. Boninger also has extensive experience and publications related to training researchers. His students have won more than 50 national awards. Boninger holds four United States patents and has received numerous honors, including being inducted into the National Academy of Medicine) of the National Academy of Science.

Michael Walker

Michael Walker

Mike Walker is a program manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. His research interests include machine reasoning about software in situ and the automation of application security lifecycles. Prior to joining DARPA, Walker worked in industry as a security software developer, Red Team analyst, enterprise security architect and research lab leader. As part of the Computer Science Corporation "Strikeforce" Red Team, Walker helped develop the HEAT Vulnerability Scanner and performed Red Team engagements. Serving as a principal at the Intrepidus Group, Walker worked on Red Teams that tested America's financial and energy infrastructure for security weaknesses. On the DARPA SAFER Red Team, he discovered flaws in prototype communications technologies. He has participated in various roles in numerous applied computer security competitions. He contributed challenges to DEF CON Capture the Flag (CTF) and competed on and led CTF teams at the highest levels of international competition. Walker was formerly a mentor of the Computer Security Competition Club at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology.

Raffi Krikorian

Raffi Krikorian

Raffi Krikorian is director of Uber's Advanced Technologies Center, which is focused on building massive scale data and software platforms to change computing, transportation and the world with self-driving technology. Until August 2014, he was Twitter's vice president of engineering in charge of the Platform, the core infrastructure of Twitter. He managed 400 people who worked on, among other things, the business logic, scalable services, APIs, storage, core libraries and the internal development model of all of Twitter. Krikorian attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His work involved creating a new kind of network for everyday devices called "Internet-0," an analogue to the Internet of Things. 

Robin Murphy

Robin R. Murphy

Robin R. Murphy, the Raytheon Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, directs the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue and TEES Center for Emergency Informatics. She received a bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and Ph.D. in computer science in 1980, 1989 and 1992, respectively, from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She has more than 150 publications on artificial intelligence, human-robot interaction and robotics, including disaster robotics, which won the 2014 PROSE honorable mention award for engineering and science. An IEEE Fellow, a TED speaker and founder of Roboticists Without Borders, she has deployed ground, air and marine robots at 26 disasters in five countries, including the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster, Hurricane Katrina and Fukushima Daiichi. Her numerous awards include the ACM Eugene L. Lawler Award for Humanitarian Contributions and the U.S. Air Force Distinguished Civilian Service Medal. She has been declared an Agent of Change (TIME), an Alpha Geek (WIRED), one of the Most Influential Women in Technology (Fast Company), and one of the Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers for 2015 (Government Technology Magazine). Murphy has performed extensive government service, including service on the Defense Science Board.

Ryan Calo

Ryan Calo

Ryan Calo is an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law. He is a faculty co-director of the Tech Policy Lab, a unique, interdisciplinary research unit that spans the School of Law, the Information School, and the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Professor Calo holds courtesy appointments at the University of Washington Information School and the Oregon State University School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering. He is an affiliate scholar at the Stanford University Law School Center for Internet and Society (CIS), the Yale University Law School Information Society Project (ISP) and New America. His research on law and emerging technology appears in leading law reviews (California Law Review, University of Chicago Law Review) and technical publications (Nature, Science, Artificial Intelligence) and is frequently referenced by the mainstream media (NPR, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal). Professor Calo has testified before the United States Senate and the German Parliament and has organized events on behalf of the National Science Foundation, the Department of Homeland Security and the White House. Business Insider named him one of the most influential people in robotics.

Stefano Ermon

Stefano Ermon

Stefano Ermon is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he is affiliated with the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He completed his Ph.D. in computer science at Cornell in 2015. His research interests include techniques for scalable and accurate inference in graphical models, statistical modeling of data, large-scale combinatorial optimization, and robust decision-making under uncertainty. Ermon is motivated by a range of applications, in particular ones in the emerging field of computational sustainability.

Stephen F. Smith

Stephen F. Smith

Stephen F. Smith is a research professor of robotics and director of the Intelligent Coordination and Logistics Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses broadly on the theory and practice of next-generation technologies for automated planning, scheduling and coordination. He pioneered the development and use of constraint-based search and optimization models, and has successfully fielded AI-based planning and scheduling systems in a range of application domains.

In recent years, Smith has turned his attention to the growing problems of congestion and mobility faced by cities. His work on smart traffic signals, which combines concepts from artificial intelligence and traffic theory, has led to development of the Surtrac (Scalable Urban Traffic Control) adaptive traffic signal control system.  Surtrac has demonstrated significant improvements in traffic flow efficiency and air quality in actual operation in the field, and currently controls a network of 50 intersections in the East End of Pittsburgh. Smith’s current work focuses on integrating adaptive signal control with emerging connected vehicle and autonomous vehicle technology, and on developing the broader transportation infrastructure that will enable mobility in smart cities of the future. He is a fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and currently serves on the AAAI Executive Council. 

Suchi Saria

Suchi Saria

Suchi Saria is an assistant professor of computer science, health policy and statistics at Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests are in statistical machine learning and precision health care. She is focused on designing novel data-driven computing tools for optimizing care delivery. Her work is being used to drive electronic surveillance for reducing adverse events in the inpatient setting and to individualize disease management in complex, chronic diseases. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her work has received recognition in the form of two cover articles in Science Translational Medicine, and paper awards from the Association for Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence and the American Medical Informatics Association. She also has received an Annual Scientific Award by the Society of Critical Care Medicine, a Rambus Fellowship, a National Science Foundation Computing Innovation Fellowship, and competitive awards from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and Google Research. In 2015, she was selected by the IEEE Intelligent Systems to the AI's 10 to Watch list. In 2016, she was selected as a DARPA Young Faculty awardee and named to Popular Science's Brilliant 10.

Tanya Berger-Wolf

Tanya Berger-Wolf, a professor of computer science at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), heads the Computational Population Biology Lab. Berger-Wolf is a computational ecologist whose research is at the unique intersection of computer science, wildlife biology and social sciences. She creates computational solutions to help answer biological questions of why social animals (including humans) do what they do, including social network analysis for understanding how leaders emerge and affect group decisions. Berger-Wolf is  co-founder of the conservation software nonprofit Wildbook, which recently enabled the first-of-its-kind complete species census of the endangered Grevy's zebra, using 100,000 photographs taken by ordinary citizens in Kenya. Berger-Wolf holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has received numerous awards for her research and mentoring, including the U.S. National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Association for Women in Science Chicago Innovator Award and the UIC Mentor of the Year Award.

Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun is director of AI Research at Facebook and the Silver Professor at New York University, where he is affiliated with the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, the Center for Neural Science, and the Center for Data Science, for which he served as founding director. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris). After a postdoc at the University of Toronto, he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories. He led the Image Processing Research Department at AT&T Labs-Research, and joined NYU after a short tenure at the NEC Research Institute. LeCun holds the 2015-2016 annual visiting professor chair of computer science at Collège de France. His research interests include machine learning and artificial intelligence, with applications to computer vision, natural language understanding, robotics and computational neuroscience. He is best known for his work in deep learning and the invention of the convolutional network method, which is widely used for image, video and speech recognition. He holds the IEEE Neural Network Pioneer Award and the IEEE Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence Distinguished Researcher Award.